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POSTED
2020-04-07
07-081940
08-47148
09-081966
10-31

How can an understanding and policy of openness lead to a reduction in both susceptibility to being hurt and also the need to overcome fear to be raw and authentic?

This page is a stub, created on 2020-04-07 (last updated on 2022-08-21). Its contents are notes on the issues and angles I want to address about this topic.


I want to write a few things about the distinction between what I call "technical vulnerability" (which is actually risking pain by equipping others with the tools to harm you through your own openness and authenticity) and the feeling of vulnerability (which is about the feeling of fear and requiring courage to be open, raw, and authentic). (related Facebook post from 2019-06-07)

An additional thing to explore is how a policy of openness and authenticity that's grounded in a deep understanding of its overall and long-term benefits leads not only to the reduction of fear and the need of courage to be "vulnerable" (this is maybe what Brené Brown means when she describes "shame resilience"), but an actual reduction in the "technical vulnerability" of being hurt by others, since one's emotional calibration becomes less sensitive to others' intentional or unintentional weaponization of openness.

Maybe this needs to go into a different post, but I want to address the issue of when openness and transparency masquerade as vulnerability (not "technical vulnerability", but the sense in which vulnerability is a means of deep connection between people).

Other points to explore: